Science parallels art as a subject matter and a source of inspiration.

Here at Science World, we are proud to work with local artists who are interested in and inspired by science. Our art displays showcase different works of art within our false creek facility. Recent displays have included art work by Peter Holmes, Sharon Kallis, Michael Hall, Chris Waind and a group of art students from Emily Carr University. We also host an annual display of the Nikon Small World Photomicrography Contest winners.

Currently On Display

Nikon Small World
Nikon Small World

Science World is pleased to showcase the winners of the 2015 Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition. Each photomicrograph serves to show just how close the beauty and wonder of the micro-world truly is—not just for scientists, but anyone willing to open their eyes and look for it. While the top images cover a variety of subject matter, each one exhibits the exemplary technique, scientific discipline and artistry for which Nikon Small World is known.

Exhibition runs October, 2016–February, 2017

Bronze Sculptures of Drs James Till and Ernest McCulloch
Till and McCulloch

Drs James Till and Ernest McCulloch were two Canadian scientists who pioneered the field of stem cell research with the discovery of a method to detect cells able to restore blood production in transplanted irradiated mice. This finding prompted the later identification of cells able to regenerate other tissues, including skin, muscle and brain. This has led to advances in research and treatment of cancer.

The bronze sculptures of Drs Till and McCulloch installed outside our entrance were a gift to Science World from STEMCELL Technologies Inc. to celebrate the 55th anniversary of the discovery of stem cells, a field of scientific study that is distinctly Canadian in origin. As a charitable organization, Science World values donations from the community to help promote science literacy across the province.

Till and McCulloch represent a proud moment in Canadian scientific history. These sculptures recognize Canadians as the forerunners of stem cell research. Their scientific research has been embraced and continues to be developed by researchers all over the world, such as the research by Dr Connie Eaves, of the BC Cancer Research Centre, who worked with Dr Till.

The bronze sculpture installation is also the perfect opportunity to initiate important dialogue about diversity in the scientific community and celebrate the proud moments of all Canadians. Young scientists from diverse backgrounds can engage with the piece on the three “empty” stools. Such an act can celebrate the past, challenge the present and look towards a brighter future. Till and McCulloch's pioneering stem cell research, and many other types of important scientific research, inspires scientists of diverse genders, ethnicities and experiences all over the world to use these discoveries to understand and conquer many human diseases that affect us all.

Artist Contact

If you are an artist interested in displaying your science-inspired artwork at TELUS World of Science, please contact us:

604.443.7553  |