Our Mission and History

Our Mission

To engage British Columbians in science and to inspire future science and technology leadership throughout our province.

Timeline 

2012

The Ken Spencer Science Park is complete and open to the public. 

2010

Science World begins extensive renovations to the building to repair the failed building envelope, expand the lobby, create additional gallery space, and ‘green’ the building. It also undergoes extensive community consultation for the creation of an outdoor science gallery and exhibition space to be known as the Ken Spencer Science Park, and hosts Dr Gunther von Hagens’ world-famous BODY WORLDS & The Brain.

2009

Renovations to Search: Sara Stern Gallery complete. Science World celebrates 20 years under the dome with a week-long series of events, including Free Family Day, presented by BC Hydro which welcomed over 10,000 people.

2008

BodyWorks wins the CASCade award for Best Exhibit or Show at the Canadian Association of Science Centres’ annual conference. Major renovations to the lobby and Search are underway.

2007

Science World opens BodyWorks, a transportable gallery answering the questions of What Can I Do?, How Do I Look? and What’s Inside Me?.

2006–07

Science World presents Gunther von Hagens’ BODY WORLDS 3: The Anatomical Exhibition of Real Human Bodies, a one-of-a-kind opportunity to experience the incredible structure of the human body in plastinated form. A record 830,372 people visited TELUS World of Science in this fiscal year.

2006

Science World enters into the next phase of ReGeneration, the Champions of the Future Campaign, to renew its infrastructure and pursue the construction of an outdoor science experience.

2005

Our iconic False Creek facility is renamed TELUS World of Science. Science World receives $5 million in funding from the BC Government to support the BC Program for the Awareness and Learning of Science (BC PALS), which entitles every K-7 student in the province to a free Science World experience.

2004

Science World enters into a groundbreaking $9 million, naming-rights agreement with TELUS.

2003

The final exhibits for Eureka! are installed, signifying completion of Phase 2 of this high-energy gallery that explores the themes of water, light and motion.

2002

Fundraising, design and fabrication begins for the main permanent gallery, Mitchell Odyssey Foundation Gallery: Eureka!

2001

Science World co-produces the world-class exhibition China! 7000 Years of Innovation and opens three new areas in the ReGeneration program: Kidspace, Our World Gallery and the Science Theatre. 

2000

The Quality Council of BC recognizes Science World with the Award of Distinction in the area of Customer Focus. Science World helps develop the blockbuster exhibition Grossology: The (Impolite) Science of the Human Body.

1999

Science World begins pre-planning for significant rejuvenation of its exhibits and facilities—Science World: The ReGeneration.

1992–98

Science World continues to provide world-class exhibits and learning experiences.

1991–92

The Exhibits Capital Campaign receives funds from the government and private sector for the remainder of the Main Gallery.

1990

Science World welcomes 705,000 visitors in its first year and visits 96 BC communities with its outreach program.

1989

On May 6, the fully refurbished 10,200 square metre Science World, featuring dozens of hands-on exhibits in five new galleries and the largest OMNIMAX® dome screen in the world, opens to the public. Learn about the full history of our building. 

1988

Construction for a new addition gets under way.

1987–89

The Provincial and Federal Governments announce their support of $5 million each, the City of Vancouver and the Greater Vancouver Regional District join with a further $1 million apiece and a capital campaign raises $7.1 million from the private sector for a total of $19.1 million to build an addition to the Expo Centre, redesign the interior and develop and build exhibits. 

1987

The three levels of government announce that the Expo Centre will become Science World British Columbia and Queen Elizabeth II dedicates the building “for the people of British Columbia”.

1982–87

The ASTC Science World Society works with the City of Vancouver, the Province of British Columbia and the Government of Canada in the search for a permanent, larger home.

1982

The demonstration Arts, Sciences and Technology Centre (ASTC) opens at 600 Granville Street in a building donated by Arthur Block.

1977

The Junior League of Greater Vancouver and the Vancouver Social Planning Department join forces to found a not-for-profit society dedicated to creating a hands-on, informal learning centre for science and technology serving all of British Columbia.