Discover

Once a fluffy hatchling, learn how the T. rex evolved into a ferocious hunter through interactive activities that bring it to life. 

Unleash your inner paleontologist, identify the first dinosaur egg and inspect early evidence of dinosaur feathers. Using your imagination, choose a colour scheme for a virtual T.rex then head to the roar mixer to create your own version of its roar by blending the sounds of birds, crocodiles and other living animals. 

In T.rex: The Ultimate Predator, you will discover a new story about the T.rex and explore how it lived, hunted, and thrived in its environment for millennia.  

What do we know about the T.rex?

What do we know about the T.rex?

The T.rex was discovered more than a hundred years ago

In the early 1900s, Barnum Brown, a famous fossil hunter and paleontologist from the American Museum of Natural History discovered the first skeleton of Tyrannosaurus rex in Hell Creek, Montana.

What do we know about the T.rex?

The name “Tyrannosaurus rex” means tyrant lizard king

Derived from the Greek word “Tyrannosaurus” meaning “tyrant lizard,” and the Latin word “rex” meaning “king,” this rapacious predator with its huge head and puny arms could bite with about 34,000 newtons of force—so powerful that it could crush bones! During its time, T.rex truly lived as “King of the Tyrant Lizards.”

What do we know about the T.rex?

The T.rex is just one kind of tyrannosaur

“Tyrannosaurs” is the name of a group of closely related dinosaurs that includes dozens of different kinds of animals. Tyrannosaurs evolved for over 100 million years, with T. rex—its biggest and most famous member—appearing during the last two million.

What do we know about the T.rex?

A baby T.rex had very different features than an adult T.rex

Every formidable adult T.rex started out as a small, helpless hatchling. Paleontologists say they were covered in fluffy feathers and had tiny sharp teeth, large eyes, and a long tail. As they grew, they had fewer feathers—usually only on their heads and necks, their hands became tinier, their body became more muscular, their teeth became more bladelike and their bone-crushing bite became even stronger.

What do we know about the T.rex?

Wanna learn more about the T.rex?

With new discoveries every year, we are learning more and more about the T.rex. Visit us to uncover its untold story!

What colour was T.rex?

Nobody knows! Paleontologists have learned from fossils that the T. rex was probably covered with scales and feathers but no one knows if it was as colourful as a peacock or as drab as a lizard.

Where did T.rex live?

In western North America.

According to Paleontologists, T.rex possibly lived as far north as Alaska and as far south as Mexico. A number of T. rex fossils have been found in Montana and South Dakota in the United States, and in Alberta, Canada.

About the sticker

Western Dinosaur

Artist: Ty Dale

From Canada, Ty was born in Vancouver, British Columbia in 1993. From his chaotic workspace he draws in several different illustrative styles with thick outlines, bold colours and quirky-child like drawings. Ty distils the world around him into its basic geometry, prompting us to look at the mundane in a different way.

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Western Dinosaur

Drag to move

About the sticker

T-Rex and Baby

Artist: Michelle Yong

Michelle is a designer with a focus on creating joyful digital experiences! She enjoys exploring the potential forms that an idea can express itself in and helping then take shape.

You found a sticker!

T-Rex and Baby

Drag to move

About the sticker

Survivors

Artist: Jeff Kulak

Jeff is a senior graphic designer at Science World. His illustration work has been published in the Walrus, The National Post, Reader’s Digest and Chickadee Magazine. He loves to make music, ride bikes, and spend time in the forest.

About the sticker

Egg BB

Artist: Jeff Kulak

Jeff is a senior graphic designer at Science World. His illustration work has been published in the Walrus, The National Post, Reader’s Digest and Chickadee Magazine. He loves to make music, ride bikes, and spend time in the forest.

About the sticker

Comet Crisp

Artist: Jeff Kulak

Jeff is a senior graphic designer at Science World. His illustration work has been published in the Walrus, The National Post, Reader’s Digest and Chickadee Magazine. He loves to make music, ride bikes, and spend time in the forest.

About the sticker

T-Rex and Baby

Artist: Michelle Yong

Michelle is a designer with a focus on creating joyful digital experiences! She enjoys exploring the potential forms that an idea can express itself in and helping then take shape.

About the sticker

Buddy the T-Rex

Artist: Michelle Yong

Michelle is a designer with a focus on creating joyful digital experiences! She enjoys exploring the potential forms that an idea can express itself in and helping then take shape.

About the sticker

Geodessy

Artist: Michelle Yong

Michelle is a designer with a focus on creating joyful digital experiences! She enjoys exploring the potential forms that an idea can express itself in and helping then take shape.

About the sticker

Science Buddies

Artist: Ty Dale

From Canada, Ty was born in Vancouver, British Columbia in 1993. From his chaotic workspace he draws in several different illustrative styles with thick outlines, bold colours and quirky-child like drawings. Ty distils the world around him into its basic geometry, prompting us to look at the mundane in a different way.

About the sticker

Western Dinosaur

Artist: Ty Dale

From Canada, Ty was born in Vancouver, British Columbia in 1993. From his chaotic workspace he draws in several different illustrative styles with thick outlines, bold colours and quirky-child like drawings. Ty distils the world around him into its basic geometry, prompting us to look at the mundane in a different way.

About the sticker

Time-Travel T-Rex

Artist: Ty Dale

From Canada, Ty was born in Vancouver, British Columbia in 1993. From his chaotic workspace he draws in several different illustrative styles with thick outlines, bold colours and quirky-child like drawings. Ty distils the world around him into its basic geometry, prompting us to look at the mundane in a different way.